Friday, February 15th, 2013: Arts Education Report (DISTINCTION)

Received a (75–84% (Distinction) for the unit.

Arts Education Report (500 words)

Student Number & Name Kimi Year of Student Year 4
Student Visual Arts Report (500 words)Kimi showed extreme interest and enthusiasm in her art workshops. She achieved year-level outcomes for appreciating the use of particular artistic techniques and identifying connections between artworks. Kimi displays increased confidence and artistic skill development through her emotional response using colour and line; and her participation in printmaking, exceeding the task outcome by creating two stencils, and three prints.Kimi experienced tactile hesitation towards using charcoal for the first time, and while the task wasn’t mandatory, managed to overcome her discomfort and finish the drawing exercise later at her own pace. While having prior knowledge in painting and drawing, her colour mixing skills in creating values and tones are beginning to show progress; her drawing skills showed no significant progress but with practice should improve.

Kimi has satisfactorily completed all visual art tasks during the duration of the workshops and demonstrates an awareness of visual art concepts, including presentation, through drawing/painting/colour mixing/printing/ceramic activities.

Key Learning Areas/Outcomes

Stage 2:

  • VAS2.2 – Uses the forms to suggest the qualities of subject matter (NSW, 2006).
  • Experimented with techniques in painting, drawing, printmaking and ceramics to create effects.
    • VAS2.4 – Identifies connections between subject matter in artworks and what they refer to, and appreciates the use of particular techniques (NSW, 2006).
    • Identifies resemblances between subject matter in artworks and the features of things as they exist in the world, recognising similarities and differences in how things are represented in the artworks

Years 3-4:

  • They will learn to present their work for others to view, and to understand that presentations (including exhibitions) have a purpose (ACARA Australian Curriculum, 2011).
  • Students will develop skills as they consciously start to experiment with equipment, materials, media and technologies (ACARA Australian Curriculum, 2011)

Late Childhood:

  • 7.LC.3 – learns about traditions and techniques associated with different artistic works in the visual arts (e.g. drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture) (ACT, 2007).
  • 7.LC.6 – learns to explore different materials, techniques and processes to make 2D and 3D artistic works (ACT, 2007).
  • 7.LC.12 – learns to interpret and respond to a range of artistic works, identifying some of the skills, elements and techniques used to create meanings and giving reasons for their interpretations and preferences (ACT, 2007).
Research Justification (350 words)Darby (2013) says that writing reports “should be a positive experience”. I agree and will begin by stating that in my opinion ‘interest’ and ‘enthusiasm’ create ‘engagement’. This is important to note in report writing because as Eisner (1998) states “engagement with the arts helps young people become more aware of multiple perspectives”, and offers students “different ways of looking at things” which “opens up the way to learn respect for other people’s views” (Eisner, 1998). These views also help students to express opinions about how art is represented in particular forms and aids them to “appreciate the skills involved to achieve these effects” (NSW, 2006). This report has commented on skills that needed improvement. Collins stated “the trick to report writing is to write the anti-report, and then reword it in a politically correct way” (2012); which is what I’ve tried to do. This idea is backed by Darby who said that the most important to keep in mind is “that reporting is as much about improving future performance as it is about commenting on past achievements” (Darby, 2013). The Department of Education and Training in ACT adds that “the key purpose of reporting is to support student learning by providing information to students and parents or carers about student achievement and progress and to indicate areas for further development” (ACT, 2007), and I’ve tried to do just that.A difficult task in writing this report that I’ve encountered was finding a way to fit in specific language, and all key learning areas within a short word count. I decided to report on the most significant areas and to use simple language. I did this so that the report would be readable by anyone, because “teachers must ensure that…reports are understandable to students and parents” (ACT, 2007). And finally, I think most importantly, the report is based on key learning areas for a Year 4 student in visual arts. Almost everything I commented on is based on a specific KLA (as can be seen in the chart above). For instance I referred to ‘particular artistic techniques and identifying connections between artworks’; this is directly correlated to “VAS2.2 – Uses the forms to suggest the qualities of subject matter” (NSW, 2006); and “VAS2.4 – Identifies connections between subject matter in artworks and what they refer to, and appreciates the use of particular techniques” (NSW, 2006).
References (minimum of 4 academic references)ACARA Australian Curriculum, A. a. (2011). Shape of the Australian Curriculum: The Arts. Retrieved February 15th, 2013 from Australian Curriculum: http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/Shape_of_the_Australian_Curriculum_The_Arts_-_Compressed.pdfACT, Department of Education and Training. (2007). Every chance to learn: Curriculum Framework for ACT Schools: Preschool to Year 10. Stirling, ACT: ACT Dept. of Education and Training.

Collins, A. (2012). Week 6: Intro Seminar. [Lecture Notes]. Unit 8915 Arts Education. University of Canberra

Darby, D. M. (2013). Student Reports Checklist. Retrieved February 15th, 2013 from Artseducationguru.com: http://artseducationguru.com/student-reports-checklist/

Eisner, E. (1998). Does experience in the arts boost academic achievement? Journal of Art and Design Education, 17 (1), 51-60.

NSW, Board of Studies. (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved February 15th, 2013 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/arts/k6_creative_arts_syl.pdf

Arts Education Statement (500 words): “Arts Education is an essential part of a well rounded education.”

The role of arts education fits many needs within a well-rounded education. Arts education is an essential part of curriculum because “it helps create well-rounded people” (Collins, 2012); it links to Key Learning Areas and helps to engage students in learning (Collins, 2012); it “nurtures the importance of having passions” (Collins, 2012) and is a positive outlet (Collins, 2012).

Drama is a collaborative process in which participants use their “critical thinking abilities, verbal and non-verbal communication skills, and empathic responses” (Poston-Anderson, 2007) through imitation “make believe, and social interaction with real and imaginary others” (Koster, 2009). The National Dance Education Organization (2013) categorises dance as a “basic form of cultural expression” (NDEO, 2013) that “integrates kinesthetic learning with understanding” (NDEO, 2013). Payne (1992) suggests that dance is especially appropriate for children with language, communication, or learning difficulties. Visual arts education builds visual perception, nurtures creative thinking (Koster, 2009). Visual Arts can also “externalize ideas, feelings and beliefs, and convey meanings and messages” (Wright, 1997) that are otherwise difficult to. Music education creates “the development of attitudes and behaviours that promote school performance” (McCarthy, 2004) where students learn how to collaborate with others, accept constructive criticism and develop a sense of self-efficacy (McCarthy, 2004). Music helps stimulate brain growth, well being (Koster, 2009) and develops self-discipline, understanding of consequences, and teamwork, “skills that promote success in life as well as school” (McCarthy, 2004). Music education benefits also stem from the planning and practice required preparing for a performance and “activities that depend on teamwork and trust” (McCarthy, 2004).

The arts education “improves attitudes and skills that promote the learning process”, “particularly the ability to learn how to learn” as well as increases school attendance and interest in school (McCarthy, 2004, p. 8). Studies show students who participate in arts education outperform academically “arts poor students by virtually every measure” (Dinham, 2011) and that “sustained involvement in particular art forms” is highly correlated with success in mathematics and reading and significant positive effects on learning in other domains” (Dinham, 2011) as well. “The arts allow perception, awareness, judgment and the expression of ideas to occur in ways that are not purely linguistic or mathematical, as in reading, writing, science and technology study” (Wright, 1997). Arts education also enhances basic life skills “such as grades and test scores” (Dinham, 2011), communication skills and increases self-esteem and confidence (Arts, 2004). A recent study by The Australia Council for the Arts (2010) stated that the one individual benefit of the arts was intellectual growth, “exposing us to new ideas and getting us to question things” (Arts, 2010).

I feel it is important for arts education to be integrated in the school curriculum for many reasons, that benefit the student and the community (Koster, 2009) as it offers “a significant educational contribution to a child’s development and future role in society” (Dinham, 2011). When the arts are taught well, students are engaged in learning (Eisner, 1998) and they “begin to make connections to the social and cultural world beyond the school” and are “able to understand the importance of social responsibility”; develop emotional intelligence and express their feelings in a coherent way and therefore are sensitive to the feelings of others (Eisner, 1998).

References

ACARA Australian Curriculum, A. a. (2011). Shape of the Australian Curriculum: The Arts. Retrieved February 15th, 2013 from Australian Curriculum: http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/Shape_of_the_Australian_Curriculum_The_Arts_-_Compressed.pdf

ACT, D. o. (2007). Every chance to learn: Curriculum Framework for ACT Schools: Preschool to Year 10. Stirling, ACT: ACT Dept. of Education and Training.

Arts, A. C. (2004). Education and the Arts Strategy 2004-2007. Sydney: Australia Council for the Arts.

Arts, A. C. (2010). More than Bums on Seats: Australian Participation in the Arts. Sydney: Australia Council for the Arts.

Collins, A. (2012). Week 6: Intro Seminar. [Lecture Notes]. Unit 8915 Arts Education .

Darby, D. M. (2013). Student Reports Checklist. Retrieved February 15th, 2013 from Artseducationguru.com: http://artseducationguru.com/student-reports-checklist/

Dinham, J. (2011). Delivering authentic arts education: visual arts, drama, music, dance, media. South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning.

Eisner, E. (1998). Does experience in the arts boost academic achievement? Journal of Art and Design Education , 17 (1), 51-60.

Koster, J. (2009). Growing Artists: Teaching the Arts to Young Children (4th Edition). New York: Delmar Publishing.

McCarthy, K. Z. (2004). Gifts of the muse: Reframing the debate about the benefits of the arts. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation.

NDEO. (2013). Philosophy, Early Childhood Standards. Retrieved February 1st, 2013 from National Dance Education Organization: http://www.ndeo.org/content.aspx?page_id=22&club_id=893257&module_id=55419

NSW, B. o. (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved February 15th, 2013 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/arts/k6_creative_arts_syl.pdf

Payne, H. (1992). Dance Movement Therapy: Theory and Practice. Tavistock: Routledge.

Poston-Anderson, B. (2007). Drama: Learning Connections in Primary Schools. Australia & New Zealand: Oxford University Press.

Wright, S. (1997). Learning how to learn the arts as core in an emergent curriculum. Childhood Education , 16 (8), 361-365.

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